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Zoo project to create new jobs in Wales

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Job seekers hoping to find local employment opportunities could benefit from a new initiative at the Welsh Mountain Zoo.

The Welsh Assembly has announced funding for a new project that will provide new jobs, training opportunities and community facilities at the attraction, as well as adding a new exhibit for visitors.

Work on the new Wales Centre for Wildlife Skills and Education could be set to begin in 2012, thanks to funding from the Welsh Assembly Government’s North Wales Coast Regeneration Area programme.

Additional external investment is also needed to fund the new centre, to be run by the National Zoological Society of Wales, in partnership with Coleg Llandrillo Cymru.

The initiative will feature an all-weather tropical house and science discovery exhibition, alongside a training, skills and education centre. Employment opportunities in teaching and zoology will be created as a result.

In addition, nearby Llandrillo College will run courses in animal and life science in the centre, utilising the space as a community facility for schools and other groups.

Deputy minister for housing and regeneration, Jocelyn Davies says regeneration aims to make the most of what an area has to offer.

She said: "The zoo is already a big feature of the North Wales coast and can therefore play a big role in regenerating the area by providing new jobs, training opportunities and community facilities as well as boosting the tourism industry.

"The National Zoo’s development plans look very interesting and I commend them for their intention to develop a facility that will benefit the local area in so many ways. The educational side of the development will provide excellent new training opportunities for people across North Wales in a field where opportunities are limited at the moment."

Boosting the number of tourists visiting the area will also help to benefit the local economy, she added.

The zoo's co-director, Chris Jackson, says growing demand for training and skills in life sciences can open up a range of employment opportunities for people.

He confirmed that the project will create at least 12 new jobs at the attraction, and increase job security for existing employees.

The Wales Centre for Wildlife Skills and Education will add to the zoo's recent development programme – investment in Sea Lion Rock, a new Condor aviary and its Safari Restaurant.

Growth in Wales' manufacturing industry could also boost employment opportunities in the country.

Deputy first minister Ieuan Wyn Jones has told industry leaders that the Welsh Assembly is committed to the future of manufacturing in Wales.

He said Welsh economic policies will focus on the skills of the workforce, which could help create new jobs in the sector.

In addition, he admitted that intense competition from Eastern Europe, China and India means research and development and further training opportunities are essential to continued growth.

Recently firms including Schaeffler, Nuaire in Caerphily, DMM in Llanberis and Control Techniques Drives Ltd in Newtown have all proved successful.

Potential expansion of firms in the sector could be good news for job seekers hoping to secure new employment opportunities in manufacturing.

For more information about the Welsh Mountain Zoo, visit the official website. 

Information about jobs in manufacturing can be found on the Prospects website. 

 
2 comments
Joe Lawrence Joe Lawrence
08/07/2013

Its not very good.

 
Miss J L Broom Miss J L Broom
28/08/2012

To whom it may concern,
Please can you forward the detail of the vacancies that are available soon. I'am ex- royal navy (W.R.N.S) and ex manager for Whitbread plc. cleaner and last worked part time for Kentucky Fried Chicken. I was looking for hotel or housekeeping,waitress or bar work but keen to learn a new trade.
Thankyou Joanne Broom 020 7766 5544

 

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